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Festival Adjudicator  and Marking Process



HOW DOES AN ADJUDICATOR ASSESS THE PLAYS AT A FESTIVAL?


The Festival is a competition. Each play is assessed by a professional adjudicator who awards marks for the various aspects of the performance whilst also offering praise and suggestions for possible improvements where appropriate.


In order to understand what the adjudicator is looking for, here is a brief glance at the rules:


Firstly, it is necessary that each company taking part consists of members of a bona fide amateur society or group that exists outside and apart from the Festival.  Although all players must be amateurs, it is permissible to engage the services of a professional producer or director.


Each production must be either:

a one-act play, previously published or newly written or devised by the group.

an extract from a longer play, provided that the extract is intelligible to the audience who may not have seen the play from which the extract is taken

an abridged version of a full-length play.


Licences are required for copyright-protected works and permission obtained for any changes.


Playing times are important. All groups, both Junior and Adult, must play for a minimum of 20 minutes and a maximum of 55 minutes. Penalty points will be deducted for not keeping within the allotted times.


Groups may bring additional scenery as is considered essential for their production, but box-sets (i.e. completely enclosed sets constructed of flats standing independent of and unrelated to the curtain surround) are not permissible. A set-up time of 10 minutes is allowed prior to each performance, and afterwards there will be a further maximum time-limit of 5 minutes to strike (dismantle) the set. Again, points are deducted if time-limits are exceeded.


Our adjudicator will follow the GoDA marking system:


ACTING    40 POINTS

DIRECTION    35 POINTS

STAGE PRESENTATION  15 POINTS

DRAMATIC ACHIEVEMENT 10 POINTS


As any GoDA adjudicator will admit, an adjudication is always a personal one, but based on strict guidelines laid down by the Guild of Drama Adjudicators. It is how the play was judged and seen on the night.  

Hopefully, the above explanations will help to make the adjudicator’s assessments clear to you.


BUT DO JUDGE THE PLAYS FOR YOURSELVES AND SEE WHETHER YOU AGREE WITH THE ADJUDICATOR.